Tombs KV36 - KV42


Tomb KV36


Tomb KV36, located in the East Valley, was the burial place of the noble Maiherperi, Child of the Nursery and royal Fan-bearer. It was first discovered, and subsequently excavated, by Victor Loret in 1899.

KV36 - Papyrus of MaiherperiThe tomb lies in the southwest end of the Valley, just south of the tomb of Amenhotep II (KV35).

An entryway shaft leads directly onto the small burial chamber. The tomb was found almost intact and was undecorated.

The noble Maiherperi (Lion of the Battlefield) had amongst his titles Child of the Nursery and Royal Fan-Bearer of the Right Hand Side.
He was among the first during the New Kingdom to hold the second title, and was likely to be an advisor or bodyguard.

In Maiherperi's tomb, a papyrus (left) was found depicting him with dark skin, leading scholars to speculate that he was in fact Nubian or of Nubian descent. The papyrus in question was the Book of the Dead.

The mummy was unwrapped by Georges Daressy in March 1901, revealing a mummy whose dark skin matched that depicted on the papyrus.
KV36
Tomb of Maiherperi

..ii..Location: East Valley
..
.iDiscovered: 1899
..
iiiiExcavator: Victor Loret
..
.i.iExcavated: 1899
..
ikiTotal area: 18.54m²
..
.ki.Axis Type: Straight
..
kiDecoration:
None
..
........Objects:
Food
Game components
Human mummies
Jewellery
Mummy trappings
Scarabs and seals
Tomb equipment
Vegetal remains
Vessels
Warfare and hunting equipment
Written documents





Tomb KV37


Tomb KV37, located in the East Valley, is possibly an eighteenth dynasty tomb. Nothing is known about the tomb's owner. It was first discovered, and subsequently excavated, by Victor Loret in 1899.

KV37 - PlanThe tomb, located in the south branch of the southwest wadi, lies close to the tomb of Thutmose III (KV34). From the entrance (A), a single corridor (B) leads to a square burial chamber (C). The tomb is only partly excavated, but it appears to be undecorated throughout.

Bone fragments and pottery shards found in the tomb suggest that KV37 was originally employed for a burial, its plan and location implying that the owner was of royal descent.

The diversity of finds Loret retrieved from the tomb, including fragments of objects relating to Thutmose IV and Seti I, seem to be instrusive. It is possible that the tomb was at one time used as a workshop or possibly as a storeroom by robbers.

It has been suggested that the original owner of the tomb might have been the wife of the mayor of Thebes, Senetnay or Baketra (the Kings Adornment) whose mummies were discovered in the nearly tomb KV42.
KV37
Tomb of Unknown

..ii..Location: East Valley
..
.iDiscovered: 1899
..
iiiiExcavator: Victor Loret
..
.i.iExcavated: 1899
..
ikiTotal area: 38.04m²
..
.ki.Axis Type: Straight
..
kiDecoration:
None
..
........Objects:
Human remains
Sculpture
Vessels
Written documents




Tomb KV38


Tomb KV38, located in the East Valley, was the burial place of the eighteenth dynasty pharaoh Thutmose I. It first discovered by Victor Loret in 1899 and excavated the same year.

KV38 - PlanThe tomb lies in the southwest branch of the southwest wadi, flanked by the tombs of Twosret and Setnakhte (KV14) and Seti II (KV15).

From the entrance (A), a steep and gently bending corridor (B) leads to a small, roughly cut chamber (C). From here a central descent leads to the cartouche shaped burial chamber (D), which has a small side chamber on its left side.

The burial chamber, according to Loret, originally had a single, square pillar in its centre, but there is now no trace if it. To the rear of the chamber he found a quartzite sarcophagus and fragments of limestone slabs inscribed with texts from the Amduat.

The burial chamber was originally decorated, as traces of a decorative Kheker frieze can still be seen beneath the ceiling.
KV38
Tomb of Thutmose I

..ii..Location: East Valley
..
.iDiscovered: 1899
..
iiiiExcavator: Victor Loret
..
.i.iExcavated: 1899
..
ikiTotal area: 133.16m²
..
.ki.Axis Type: Bent
..
kiDecoration:
Painting
..
........Objects:
Architectural elements
Tomb equipment

..
At one time it was believed that KV38 was the original tomb of Thutmose I. However, a study by John Romer showed that KV38 was constructed on the orders of Thutmose III for the reburial of his grandfather, following a previous reinterment by Hatshepsut in her expansion of KV20. On completion, Thutmose III returned the body of Thutmose I to KV38 where it was placed in a new sarcophagus. At the end of the New Kingdom, the body was removed again to the cache in DB320.

The poor quality of the rock, and floodwater penetration explain the very rough condition of the tomb today. It stands open, littered with rubbish.


Tomb KV39


Tomb KV39, located in the East Valley, was possibly the burial place of the eighteenth dynasty pharaoh Amenhotep I. It was first discovered by Boutros Andraos in 1900 and excavated the same year.

KV39 - PlanKV39 is located at the head of a water course on the plateau above and to the south of the tomb of Thutmose III (KV34).

From the entrance (A), roughly cut stairs lead to a sloping corridor (B) which has been enlarged at its far end to form a small chamber. From here, in line with the axis of the corridor, a descent leads to an undecorated chamber (C).

Two further descending corridors open off the extended corridor (B). One descends to the left of the small chamber from a stairwell in the floor and continues as a rough cut sloping corridor (H) to a second stairwell leading to a rectangular burial chamber (I). Within this chamber was a pit, covered by stone slabs, intended to receive a coffin.

The other set of passages extends on an axis parallel to the entrance. A sloping corridor (D) leads to a stairwell, a second corridor (E), one further stairwell followed by a final corridor (F) which opens onto a small rectangular burial chamber G).
KV39
Tomb of Amenhotep I (?)

..ii..Location: East Valley
..
.iDiscovered: 1900
..
iiiiExcavator: Boutros Andraos
..
.i.iExcavated: 1900
..
ikiTotal area: 210.05m²
..
.ki.Axis Type: Bent
..
kiDecoration:
None visible now
..
........Objects:
Architectural elements
Clothing
Food
Human mummies
Jewellery
Mummy trappings
Religious objects
Tomb equipment
Vessels
Written documents

..
The tomb appears to have been cut in three distinct phases. The initial phase included the cutting of the entrance (A), the first corridor (B) and the first chamber (C) early in the eighteenth dynasty. The two larger extensions to chambers (I) and (G) were a later addition, although it is not certain in which order these were done.

Amenhotep I - MummyArthur Weigall, who served as Inspector-General of Antiquities from 1905 to 1914, noted that some of the original decoration remained intact at the time of his entry. He believed that the tomb belonged to Amenhotep I on the grounds that the tomb matched the location of that described for Amenhetep I's tomb in the tomb robbery papyri.

All traces of decoration were obliterated by the time John Rose cleared the tomb (1991/94). In his study of the tomb, he concluded that the tomb was indeed built, at least originally, for Amenhotep I.

Finds include potsherds, calcite fragments, pieces of wooden coffins, textiles, fragments of metal, mud jar sealings, cordage, botanical specimens and human skeletal remains of at least nine individuals.


Tomb KV40


Tomb KV40, located in the East Valley, was discovered by Victor Loret in 1899. Nothing is known about the tomb's owner, or whether it was ever used.

KV40 - general locationThe tomb is located in the south branch of the southwest wadi. The owner is unknown, but was probably not of royal descent.

The photograph on the left is of the general area of KV40, with the tomb lying to the left of the path in the centre of the photograph. The tomb is Siptah is nearby, on the path leaving the photograph centre right.

Only the upper part of the shaft of KV40 is accessible; the rest is filled with rubble, and nothing is known about the tomb's layout, decoration or contents.

The tomb was excavated by Victor Loret in 1899, but no report was ever published of his findings.
KV40
Tomb of Unknown

..ii..Location: East Valley
..
.iDiscovered: 1899
..
iiiiExcavator: Victor Loret
..
.i.iExcavated: 1899
..
ikiTotal area: 3.67m²
..
.ki.Axis Type: Unknown
..
kiDecoration:
Unknown
..
........Objects:
Unknown


Tomb KV41


Tomb KV41, located in the East Valley, was discovered by Victor Loret in 1899. Nothing is known about the tomb's owner.

DB320 - EntranceThe tomb is located behind Dayr al Bahri in the so-called 'Valley of the Pits'. It consists of a shaft about 11.24 m (36.88 feet) deep. The tomb has no side chambers and was never finished.

Elizabeth Thomas suggested that KV41 belonged to Queen Tetisheri, wife of King Seqenenra Ta'a II, one of the last kings of the seventeenth dynasty. If this is the case, then this tomb was one of the first tombs built for a queen in the Valley. There is no evidence to confirm this theory. The tomb was never used and no objects were recovered.
KV41
Tomb of Unknown

..ii..Location: East Valley
..
.iDiscovered: 1899
..
iiiiExcavator: Victor Loret
..
.i.iExcavated: 1899
..
ikiTotal area: 2.96m²
..
.ki.Axis Type: Unknown
..
kiDecoration:
Unknown
..
........Objects:
Unknown


Tomb KV42


Tomb KV42, located in the East Valley, was the burial place of the eighteenth dynasty Queen Hatshepsut-Meryet-Ra, principal wife of pharaoh Thutmose III. It was first discovered by Victor Loret in 1899, and excavated the following year.

Steps leading to KV31, KV32, KV33 and KV34KV42 is located in the south branch of the southwest wadi. A stepped entrance leads to a steep corridor and stairwell which, in turn, lead down to a small square chamber. The chamber has a bench along the entire length of the right wall.

Off the left wall a second corridor leads to a cartouche shaped burial chamber with a small side chamber off its right wall.

The burial chamber has two pillars; the one nearest the entrance is damaged, while the rearmost one is badly broken. An unfinished sarcophagus lies against the rear wall of the chamber.

There is a khekher frieze (similar to the one pictured left below), a star pattern on the ceiling, and a band of colour below the decorated area of the wall. The walls of the chamber were plastered in preparation for painting, but the decoration was never finished.
KV42
Tomb of
Hatshepsut-Meryet-Ra

..ii..Location: East Valley
..
.iDiscovered: 1899
..
iiiiExcavator: Victor Loret
..
.i.iExcavated: 1900
..
ikiTotal area: 184.77m²
..
.ki.Axis Type: Bent
..
kiDecoration:
Grafitti
Painting
..
........Objects:
Architectural elements
Religious objects
Tomb equipment
Transport
Vessels
..
KV34 - Khekher Frieze from the Hall of WaitingKV42 - burial chamber
..
Since the discovery of the foundation deposits bearing the name of Hatshepsut-Meryet-Ra in 1921, there is no doubt concerning the original owner of KV42. However, the tomb was never finished and the queen was buried elsewhere (probably in the small tomb KV60 along with her royal nurse Sit-Ra called In).

Due to evidence found on fragments of canopic jars uncovered in the tomb, KV42 may have been reused by Sennefer, mayor of Thebes, Senetnay, his wife, and Baketra (the king's adornment), during the reign of Amenhotep II or used as a cache for materials from their burials elsewhere. The tomb was plundered in antiquity.



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